The half-full glass

The half-full glass

This is for the most part the translation in English of an article I wrote in Italian on Whitney Dafoe, several months ago.

Patient zero

The 2016 edition of the Personalized Medicine World Conference (PMWC) (program) was held in San Francisco, about a year ago. During the second day of this meeting, Dr. Andreas Kogelnik, a physician and bioengineer at the Open Medicine Institute, presented some of the data on the energy metabolism of a young man suffering from ME/CFS, as an example of application of newly available metabolomic tests in difficult and still poorly understood conditions. The patient we are talking about is the son of Ronald Davis, a famous geneticist at Stanford University who is currently engaged in an ambitious research program on ME/CFS, at the Open Medicine Foundation. It is Kogelnik himself who reveals in his speech the identity of the man whose metabolic data he is talking about, and on the other hand the unfortunate events of this man were made public by his own family, in order to stimulate scientific research and investments for ME/CFS. The touching story of the progressive decline in intellectual and physical functioning of Whitney (that’s his name), has been told in this video:

A photographer and a photo of his metabolism

Whitney, who is now about 35, is no longer able to move from his bed, to read, and to communicate with his parents. He was previously a popular photographer and has traveled the world. This is his personal website. The latest update (2013) says: “Really sick.  I can’t talk. Can’t type/text enough to communicate. Haven’t had a conversation with someone in 6 months…” Whitney is a peculiar case, both because he has a particularly severe manifestation of ME/CFS (but there are other patients like him), and because his father is a professor of genetics at one of the world’s top universities (Stanford University). And what could a father-scientist do in order to save a son with an incurable condition? He studies, of course! But he does not restrict himself to scour compulsively scientific publications or biology books; he sets up a team of researchers, seeks funds to finance them, and invents new technologies to fight the disease. In the video of the intervention by Andreas Kogelnik, we can see the first outcomes of his efforts. In particular – at minute 8 – we have an eloquent snap-shot of Whitney’s energy metabolism (see figure below).

withney

Joule and glucose

Before examining Whitney’s metabolic data, let’s recall briefly that the process by which our cells extract energy from the chemical bonds of glucose, consists of two phases. The first, glycolysis, occurs in the cytoplasm (outside mitochondria) and allows to obtain two molecules of ATP from each molecule of glucose. The by-product of glycolysis consists of two molecules of pyruvate, for each molecule of glucose processed. But this by-product is the fuel that feeds the second stage, which occurs within the mitochondria. In this second phase, pyruvate is converted into acetyl-CoA (with the synthesis of 3 molecules of ATP for each molecule of pyruvate), and the acetyl-CoA is then sent to the Krebs cycle (also called the citric acid cycle), where 12 more molecules of ATP are produced, per molecule of acetyl-CoA. More precisely, the Krebs cycle produces one molecule of ATP, three of NADH and one FADH2; these last two molecules are sent to the oxidative phosphorylation (mitochondrial membrane) where they are used to synthesize a total of 11 molecules of ATP. The conclusion is that one molecule of glucose allows to produce 2 molecules of ATP in the cytoplasm, and 36 molecules within the mitochondria. (More recently a reinterpretation of the experimental evidence has suggested a slightly different result of 31 molecules of ATP from a molecule of glucose). These are the basics of the energy balance within cells. The issue becomes more complex when one considers that fatty acids and some amino acids are used by mitochondria in order to produce energy.

Half is not enough

What about the snapshot of Whitney’s energy metabolism? When account is taken of the fact that the data were presumably divided by the mean of the reference from healthy volunteers, it appears clear that his generator is running at about half of the average power. In fact, pyruvate (the end product of glycolysis) is about 0.6 of the average value, and all the metabolites of the Krebs cycle are comprised between 0.4 and 0.7. Accordingly, the level of glucose in the blood is slightly increased (Whitney’s pancreas struggles to avoid hyperglycemia, evidently), while the level of the lactate is equally low (lactate is produced from pyruvate). Now, if the cellular energy generator delivers a power (energy released per unit of time) equal to 50% of what the body normally produces, you would expect that those organs with the highest energy requirements, such as brain and muscles, are those which would suffer the most. And this theoretical model, based on real data from Whitney’s thermodynamics, would explain his symptoms. Of course, other interpretations are possible.

Outside the Krebs cycle

But where is the block in Whitney’s cellular energy generator? If glycolysis operates at 50% and if it is the glycolysis which fuels mitochondria, the answer seems simple: the block is in the cytoplasm, i.e. in glycolysis itself, outside the mitochondria. This interpretation of the data is consistent with what shown by Christopher Armstrong and his colleagues of the University of Melbourne, in 2015. The research team was indeed able to highlight a block of glycolysis, analyzing the normal panel of the organic acids in the blood and in the urine of 34 patients with ME/CFS (Armstrong CW et al. 2015). The hypothesis of a block of glycolysis is also compatible with the recent European work on ME patients from Pisa (Italy), in which an over-expression of two fundamental mitochondrial enzymes has been demonstrated (see this post). In fact, if the mitochondria were subjected to shortness of fuel, it would be logical to think that the number of their enzymes would increase, in order to extract every possible joule from the available substrate.

whitney_dafoe_before_and_after_illness

Hypometabolism as an adaptation

Another possible explanation for the overall depression of the energy system (inside and outside mitochondria) is the one provided by Robert Naviaux, in his recent publication on metabolism of ME/CFS patients. According to his vision, mitochondria are partially turned off, as a response to a persistent or past environmental threat (mainly infections or toxic substances); this response is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism, whose role is to protect the body from the threat, a bit like fever is a defense system that promotes the immune response against a virus or a bacterium. If this was true, the mitochondria block should be managed in concert with the glycolysis block, otherwise you would have the accumulation of toxic substances, such as lactate. So this hypothesis fits well with the experimental data on Whitney. It is interesting to note that recently a similar mechanism has been described as a possible basis for bacterial persistence: exposed to antibiotics, bacteria turn off their energy metabolism and thus survive to these chemicals which, for the most part, target enzymes of their metabolic machinery (Shan Y et al. 2017). This makes a lot of sense, since more than 1.45 billions years ago mitochondria were in fact bacteria (R). So Whitney’s hypometabolic state could in fact represent an evolution of bacterial persistence.

Conclusions

Whitney’s metabolism reveals an overall halving of the power delivered by the power generators of his cells. Apparently the defect is in the initial part of glucose metabolism, outside the mitochondria, and of course it is reflected on mitochondrial metabolism, which is depressed. However other interpretations of these data are possible, such as the one proposed by Naviaux and colleagues, of an overall depression of the energy system as an evolutionarily conserved response to external threats (real or perceived). In addition, although a reduction in energy of 50% would seem to explain the symptoms, you can not say that this reduction is the cause of the disease, rather than one of its many consequences.

Annunci

La storia di Whitney Dafoe

La storia di Whitney Dafoe

Whitney, che ora ha approssimativamente 33 anni, da alcuni anni non è più in grado di spostarsi dal suo letto, di leggere, e di comunicare con i suoi genitori. In passato è stato un apprezzato fotografo e ha girato il mondo. Questo è il suo sito personale. L’ultimo aggiornamento (2013) dice: “Molto malato. Non posso parlare. Non posso scrivere abbastanza per comunicare. Non intrattengo una conversazione con qualcuno da sei mesi…” Whitney è un caso singolare, sia perché ha una manifestazione particolarmente grave di ME/CFS (ma ci sono altri pazienti come lui), sia perché suo padre è un professore di genetica presso una delle migliori università del mondo (Stanford University). E cosa può fare un papà-scienziato per salvare un figlio affetto da una condizione incurabile? Studia, certo! Ma non si limita a perlustrare compulsivamente le pubblicazioni scientifiche o i libri di biologia; mette in piedi un’intera squadra di ricercatori, cerca fondi per finanziarli, e inventa nuove tecnologie, per combattere la malattia. Ho discusso alcuni dettagli del suo caso – resi pubblici dai familiari – in questo articolo.

La storia e di Whitney è raccontata nei tre video che riporto in seguito, e in questo video.

Il bicchiere mezzo pieno

Il bicchiere mezzo pieno

Il paziente zero

All’inizio di questo anno si è tenuta a San Francisco l’edizione 2016 della Personalized Medicine World Conference (PMWC) (programma). Durante la prima giornata dei lavori, il dr. Andreas Kogelnik, medico e bioingegnere presso l’Open medicine Institute, ha presentato alcuni dei dati relativi al metabolismo energetico di un giovane uomo affetto da ME/CFS, come esempio di applicazione delle nuove indagini metabolomiche in patologie difficili e ancora sconosciute. Il paziente in questione è il figlio di Ronald Davis, genetista presso la Stanford University attualmente impegnato nella ricerca sulla ME/CFS e sulla Lyme cronica, presso l’Open Medicine Foundation. E’ lo stesso Kogelnik a rivelare nel suo intervento l’identità dell’uomo di cui discute i dati metabolici, e d’altra parte le sfortunate vicende di questo ragazzo sono state rese pubbliche dalla sua stessa famiglia, anche allo scopo di incentivare la ricerca scientifica e l’investimento per la ME/CFS. Chi fosse interessato, trova un toccante racconto del progressivo declino intellettivo e fisico di Whitney (questo è il suo nome), in questo video e in quest’altro.

Un fotografo e la foto del suo metabolismo

Whitney, che ora ha approssimativamente 35 anni, da alcuni anni non è più in grado di spostarsi dal suo letto, di leggere, e di comunicare con i suoi genitori. In passato è stato un apprezzato fotografo e ha girato il mondo. Questo è il suo sito personale. L’ultimo aggiornamento (2013) dice: “Molto malato. Non posso parlare. Non posso scrivere abbastanza per comunicare. Non intrattengo una conversazione con qualcuno da sei mesi…” Whitney è un caso singolare, sia perché ha una manifestazione particolarmente grave di ME/CFS (ma ci sono altri pazienti come lui), sia perché suo padre è un professore di genetica presso una delle migliori università del mondo (Stanford University). E cosa può fare un papà-scienziato per salvare un figlio affetto da una condizione incurabile? Studia, certo! Ma non si limita a perlustrare compulsivamente le pubblicazioni scientifiche o i libri di biologia; mette in piedi un’intera squadra di ricercatori, cerca fondi per finanziarli, e inventa nuove tecnologie, per combattere la malattia. Nel video dell’intervento di Andreas Kogelnik possiamo vedere i primi risulatati del suo sforzo. In particolare al minuto 8 abbiamo una eloquente istantanea del metabolismo energetico di Whitney (vedi figura).

withney
Il livello di alcuni metaboiti della glicolisi e del ciclo di Krebs di Whitney, tratti dal video dell’intervento di Andreas Kogelnik, durante l’edizione 2016 della PMWC.

Joule e glucosio

Prima di esaminare i dati metabolici di Whitney, ricordo brevemente che il processo attraverso il quale le nostre cellule estraggono energia dai legami chimici del glucosio, consiste in due fasi. La prima, la glicolisi, avviene nel citoplasma (fuori dai mitocondri) e permette di ricavare due molecole di ATP da ogni molecola di glucosio. Lo scarto della glicolisi consiste in due molecole di piruvato, per ciascuna molecola di glucosio processata. Ma questo sottoprodotto è il carburante che alimenta la seconda fase, che si verifica all’interno dei mitocondri. In questa seconda fase, il piruvato è convertito in Acetil-CoA (con la sintesi di 3 molecole di ATP per ciascun piruvato), e l’Acetil-CoA è poi inviato al ciclo di Krebs (o ciclo dell’acido citrico), dove sono prodotte altre 12 molecole di ATP per ogni molecola di Acetil-CoA. Più precisamente, il ciclo di Krebs produce una molecola di ATP, tre di NADH e una di FADH2; queste due ultime molecole vengono inviate alla fosforilazione ossidativa (membrana dei mitocondri) dove vengono utilizzate per sintetizzare complessivamente 11 molecole di ATP. La conclusione è che una molecola di glucosio permette di produrre 2 molecole di ATP nel citoplasma, più 36 molecole all’interno dei mitocondri. Questi sono i rudimenti del bilancio energetico delle cellule. La questione si complica quando si considera che anche gli acidi grassi e alcuni amminoacidi sono utilizzati dai mitocondri per produrre energia.

Metà non basta

Cosa ci dice l’istantanea del metabolismo energetico di Whitney? Nel momento in cui si tiene conto del fatto che i dati sono stati normalizzati rispetto presumibilmente alla media aritmetica del controllo sano, emerge che il suo generatore funziona a circa metà della potenza media. Infatti, il piruvato (prodotto finale della glicolisi) è circa 0.6 del valore medio, e tutti i metaboliti del ciclo di Krebs sono compresi tra 0.4 e 0.7. Coerentemente, il livello di glucosio nel sangue è leggermente aumentato (il pancreas di Whitney riesce a evitare l’iperglicemia, evidentemente), mentre quello del lattato è altrettanto basso (il lattato è prodotto dal piruvato).  Ora, se il generatore cellulare di energia eroga una potenza (energia liberata per unità di tempo) pari al 50% di quello che normalmente l’organismo produce, ci si può aspettare che a soffrirne maggiormente siano gli organi con il più alto fabbisogno energetico, come il cervello e i muscoli. E questo modello teorico, basato sui dati reali della termodinamica di Whitney, spiegherebbe i suoi sintomi. Certamente altre interpretazioni sono possibili!

Fuori dal circolo di Krebs

Ma dove si trova il blocco del generatore cellulare del paziente zero? Se la glicolisi funziona al 50% e se è la glicolisi ad alimentare i mitocondri, la risposta sembra semplice: il blocco è nel citoplasma, cioè nella glicolisi stessa, fuori dai mitocondri. Questa interpretazione dei dati è coerente con quanto dimostrato da Christopher Armstrong e dai suoi colleghi della Università di Melbourne, nel 2015. Il gruppo di ricerca è stato infatti in grado di evidenziare un blocco della glicolisi, analizzando il normale pannello degli acidi organici nel sangue e nelle urine di 34 pazienti affetti da ME/CFS (Armstrong CW et al. 2015). L’ipotesi di un blocco della glicolisi è compatibile altresì con il recente lavoro europeo sui pazienti della reumatologia di Pisa, in cui è stata dimostrata una sovra espressione di due fondamentali enzimi mitocondriali (vedi questo post). Infatti, se i mitocondri vengono sottoposti a una riduzione dell’approvigionamento di carburante, è logico pensare che aumenteranno il numero di enzimi per estrarre ogni possibile joule dal substrato disponibile. La mia tuttavia è una semplificazione, infatti il ciclo di Krebs viene alimentato anche da carburante alternativo al piruvato, come alcuni amminoacidi e gli acidi grassi. Quindi il  ragionamento è riduttivo e non conclusivo.

whitney_dafoe_before_and_after_illness
Whitney, da questa pagina.

Ipometabolismo come adattamento

Un’altra possibile spiegazione per la complessiva depressione del sistema energetico (fuori e dentro i mitocondri) è quella fornita da Robert Naviaux, nella sua recente pubblicazione sul metabolismo della ME/CFS. Secondo la sua visione, i mitocondri vengono parzialmente spenti, come risposta a una minaccia ambientale persistente (principalmente infezioni o sostanze tossiche); questa risposta è un meccanismo evolutivamente conservato, il cui ruolo è quello di proteggere l’organismo dalla minaccia, un po’ come la febbre è un sistema di difesa che favorisce la risposta immunitaria contro un virus o un battere. Se questo fosse vero, il blocco dei mitocondri dovrebbe essere gestito in concerto con un blocco della glicolisi, altrimenti si avrebbe l’accumolo di sostanze tossiche, come il lattato. Anche questa ipotesi si adatta bene ai dati sperimentali relativi a Whitney.

Conclusione

Il metabolismo del paziente zero, ovvero del primo paziente ME/CFS soggetto a una approfondita analisi metabolica secondo le nuove tecnologie disponibili, rivela un complessivo dimezzamento della potenza erogata dai generatori di energia delle sue cellule. Apparentemente il difetto è nella parte iniziale del metabolismo del glucosio, fuori dai mitocondri, e si riverbera ovviamente sul metabolismo mitocondriale, che risulta depresso. Tuttavia altre interpretazioni di questi dati sono possibili, come quella dell’ipometabolismo proposta da Naviaux e colleghi. Inoltre, sebbene una riduzione della energia del 50% sembrerebbe spiegare i sintomi, non è possibile affermare che questa riduzione sia la causa della patologia, piuttosto che una sua semplice conseguenza.